The Copper River Watershed Project was born of deep concern for the region’s resources and the economies dependent on those resources.  We strive to support the community values of Copper River watershed residents in our efforts to foster sustainable economic development.

CRWP oversees Cooperative Weed Management Areas in Cordova and the Copper Basin to coordinate public and private resources to effectively treat high priority invasive plant species. Learn more about these cooperative efforts as well as to learn more about the high priority invasive plant species in the region.
Learn about invasive plant management »

CRWP programs take science learning outside for kids from grades K – 12. We lead field trips and classroom sessions on aquatic habitat, stormwater pollution, the salmon lifecycle, and watershed science. Students also participate in raising salmon fry from eggs in a classroom tank and releasing the fry come spring.
Learn about education »

The Copper River watershed’s remote communities have much to offer! From the Copper River delta to the Wild and Scenic Gulkana River to North America’s largest World Heritage site in Wrangell-St. Elias National Park, visitors are encouraged to explore the watershed’s unique geography and rich history.
Explore our watershed »

We have completed a variety of habitat restoration & monitoring projects throughout the Copper River watershed to improve fish passage, re-vegetate and stabilize habitats for spawning and rearing salmon, assess water quality and identify salmon habitat for listing in the Alaska Department of Fish & Game’s Andaromous Waters Catalog.
Learn about restoration »

The Trans-Alaska Pipeline System (TAPS) crosses five major tributaries to the Copper River, all of which are salmon spawning rivers. Residents of this region fear a spill from a pipeline breach could quickly end up in the main stem of the Copper River and damage spawning and migratory habitat of the world-famous Copper River salmon.
Learn about TAPS »

Concern about stormwater run-off harming Cordova’s salmon waterbodies led the CRWP to initiate a public education campaign called Don’t Run Off Salmon and to work on identifying mitigation measures for stormwater run-off in Copper River watershed communities.
Learn about stormwater management »